Growing Trees For the FutureGrowing Trees for the Future


About Me

Growing Trees For the Future

If you are interested in growing trees in your garden for the first time, it is likely that you will have some questions about how best to proceed. My name is Paul and this is my advice blog. On this blog, I aim to give you some great advice about choosing the right type of trees for your garden and picking the best spot in which to plant them. I will also let you in on a few secret tree care tips which will keep them looking super healthy. I learnt all of this information from a tree contractor who visited my property some years ago. I call him in twice a year to check on my trees and we always have a nice chat.

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Latest Posts

5 Reasons Why Your Trees May Need Pruning
22 February 2018

Tree services across Australia offer private prope

Stump Removal – Why Grinding Is the Best Solution?
21 February 2018

A fairly common feature you will find in yards is

4 Landscaping Ideas To Improve Your Backyard
12 February 2018

If you are lucky to have a backyard, it is fundame

Choosing a tree lopper
12 February 2018

Choosing a tree lopper is a serious decision, and

Knock On Wood: What Is Deadwooding, And How Can It Make My Trees Safer And Healthier?
9 February 2018

When looking at the majestic splendour of a large,

Aussie Lawn Porn and Trees: Why Your Lawn Needs a Native Australian Tree

Australians take their lawns very seriously. The English may have invented lawns in the 17th century along with the first lawn mowing machine in 1830, but in the 21st century, nobody does lawns better than Australians.

In fact, Aussies love their lawns so much that there is now even a Facebook page dedicated to them, aptly named—Lawn Porn. Started in August 2016, the page now has almost 50,000 followers!

However, not all Australian natives benefit from well-manicured lawns.

Exotic Plants and Trees Lower Biodiversity

There was once a time, back in the 1970s, when Australians favoured Australian native plants and trees. Unfortunately, back then it was thought that native plants required little maintenance. As a result, these native-filled gardens became overgrown and unattractive. This caused a shift toward neat lawns, bordered by exotic plants. Ornamental trees were also added to gardens.

However, the impact that this switch to non-native plants and trees might have had on local biodiversity was overlooked. As urban areas filled up with exotic plants and trees, insect populations plummeted. Take butterflies for example. In order for a caterpillar to become a butterfly, it needs to eat specific plant species. No insects means no birds or native wildlife.

Large Empty Lawns Harm the Environment

At a time when native Australian animal species are threatened by habitat loss, an empty lawn seems a wasted opportunity. Moreover, small ornamental pear trees, such as the Callery pear, provide none of the benefits that can be offered by a native Australian tree. For instance, a native eucalyptus tree provides nesting sites for bees, birds and reptiles.

In addition, mowing the lawn with a gas-powered lawn mower for around an hour, produces the same amount of pollution as driving your car between 160 and 320 kilometres.

Plant a Native Tree or Two

Time is of the essence. The worlds scientists are already discussing the possibility of a sixth mass extinction event on Earth. By bringing back Australia's native plants and trees to their gardens in urban areas, Australians can replace the native animal habitats that were lost due to human expansion.

If your lawn is bare and surrounded by foreign plants, consider planting one or two native Australian trees for the insects, birds and reptiles. A Moreton Bay Fig tree on your lawn will provide shelter and food for a range of insects, birds, marsupials and reptiles. It will also give you plenty of shade and add value to your property.

Australia needs its natives. That means you and every other form of life. Plant Australian and provide the struggling native animals and insects with a new home, one to replace that which has been lost to human expansion.